Revised 4/11/2017. Copyright @2017; The following Documentary Timeline has been compiled and created by Paul Rhetts. It may be copied for research purposes; but it may not be reproduced for inclusion in any printed or electronic distribution of any kind without the express written permission of the author. Any requests to use this information should be sent to Paul Rhetts, LPDPress@q.com.


John Wolfensbarger m. Christina Frey
s/o
d/o

DAR #A058993 
SERVICE: VIRGINIA 
Service Source: 
Service Desc: Gave supplies, Claim dated 26 Nov 1780 
Rank: PATRIOTIC SERVICE 
RESIDENCE 1) County: CULPEPER CO - State: VIRGINIA 

SPOUSE 1) KATHERINE X 

ASSOCIATED APPLICATIONS AND SUPPLEMENTALS 
Nat’l Num 
Add 
Vol. 
Docs 

Child 
[Spouse #] Spouse 
673394 
708 

PHILIP 
[1] CHRISTINA KOONTZ 
PURCHASE 

SAR 72754, 70720, 74574 

DOCUMENTS 
1800 Federal Census 
1810 Federal Census 
1812 Surry Co Tax list 
1820 Federal Census 
1830 Federal Census 
1840 Rev War Pension list 
SAR Ap 72754 
SAR Ap 70720 
SAR Ap 74574 

John III, son of John, Jr. married Christina FREY in abt 1777. JohnIII had moved to Surry Co NC in 1776 so Christina was perhaps a nativeof NC. She died in about 1833 then he moved to Highland Co, OH in 1833and died 17 Nov 1840. John III changed his surname to W. SPARGER in NCthen changed it to SPARGUR in Ohio. It is believed that all theirchildren were born under the name of SPARGER. His children that movedto Ohio also changed their names to SPARGUR. Christina was thedaughter of Valentine FREY and Anna Maria Barbara BINCKELE, was bornnear Berne, Switzerland. She was born 4 March 1704. Valentine was theson of Peter FREY. Valentine FREY was born 9 May 1721 at Wingen,Alsace. Christina's maternial Grandfather had 23 children by twowives. Christina is buried in an old country grave yard, near Mt Airy,within sight of the old home adjoining the property of the SPARGEROrchard Company. There is a group of six graves, said to be those ofChristina and some of her family. These graves are not marked so theycan be identified, but they have rough stones at the head and foot ofeach grave. 

John Wolfenberger, son of John Wolfenberger and grandson of JohanWolfersberger, the emigrant who came to America on the Thistle ofGlasgow eventually settled in North Carolina and married ChristinaFrey. Sometime after his marriage he changed his name to John W.Sparger and named his children Reuben W. Sparger, Joseph W. Sparger,etc. The story told about this name change is as follows: The sheriffcalled on John to serve a warrant calling John for jury duty. As manyothers, he had trouble with names of some of the Moravians that livedin the County. The warrant was made out in the name of John W.Sparger. 

Apparently, John liked this change in name. When his children grew toadults, some of them resettled in Highland Co. Ohio and changed thespelling to Spargur. The reason for this change is not made clear.Those that remained in North Carolina retained the Sparger spelling.Among those who stayed in North Carolina was John W. Sparger (Jr.) whomarried Sarah Lyon about 1816. After John's wife. Christina, died,Rueben Spargur returned to North Carolina and took his father back toOhio with him. John W. Sparger died in Ohio and his grave marker showshis name as John W. Spargur. 

See history of Shenandoah County Virginia pages8,45,95,96,124,131-134,709-713. Also references John, Peter, Benjamin Wolfenbarger pg231, and John(Johannes) Wolfenbarger/Wolfensberger Jn asVestryman-Beckford Parish pg 523 

The writings of W. M. Creasy make no mention of Revolutionary Warservice for John W. Sparger (1754-1840). 

For his father (John Wolfersberger, 1730-1788, m. Hannah Summer), thefollowing notes are in W. M. Creasy's records 

It is very clear that he adopted the spelling WOLFENBARGER after hewent to Shenandoah County, VA, some time prior to 1771. See thecomments under Peter (#333) for the identification of his wife asHannah. No record of John is found in Pennsylvania after thetransaction concerning land formerly belonging to his father John(#367), but reference is found in the History of Shenandoah County,VA, by John W. Wayland on page 523, where John Wolfenberger (Note theywere all called Wolfenbergers in Shenandoah County) with others tookoath as Vestrymen in Beckford Parish on March 6, 1771. It will beshown later that this John was the father of John who settled in NorthCarolina and is without doubt the "man named Wolfesperger who formerlylived near Lititz but is now in Virginia" mentioned in the MoravianRecords in North Carolina in December 1776. 

It should be explained that while the Wolfersbergers were Lutheransand Reformed Church people, the office of Vestryman in the EpiscopalChurch, which was the established Church in Virginia at that time, wasfrequently conferred upon members of other denominations because therewere probably not enough Episcopalians in the Parish to fill theoffices of Vestrymen. It is explained by a genealogist that this wasoften the case, the Lutheran Church being the established Church inGermany or at least the favored church of the governing classes, itwas most natural to appoint a Lutheran or Reformed as a Vestryman. TheLutheran and Reformed always had joint churches in these parts.Muhlenberg, the Lutheran minister at Woodstock where John Wolfenbargerlived, was ordained an Episcopal minister in order that he mightperform marriages. 

John Wolfenbarger purchased land in Shehandoah County, VA, June 51781. Deed Book C p. 433, Deed Book K p. 496. Sept 29, 17?5 thefollowing record is found Peter Wolfenberger and Susan his wife,Frederick and Catherine his wife, Phillipp Wolfenbarger and Hannah hiswife, Martin Miller and Mary his wife, Jacob Wolfenbarger and Nancyhis wife, of Shenandoah County, VA, and JOHN WOLFENBARGER ANDCHRISTINA HIS WIFE, of Surry County, NC, children and heirs childrenand heirs deceased, to Benjamin Wolfenberger of the County ofShenandoah, two lots in the town of Woodstock of which JohnWolfenberger died seized and possessed, known as lots 4 and 76 beingthe same lots one half acre each which were conveyed by Nounce Byrdand Clara his wife to Peter Wolfenberger by deed of lease and releaseMay 24, 1780. Benjamin Wolfenberger who bought the land from theestate was also one of John's sons and qualified as Administrator ofhis estate. According to the final settlement filed with the CourtSept 10, 1792, he died about Nov 18, 1788 and in the record ofdisbursement is an item paid David Jordan (School Master), sixshillings for reading the funeral service at the burial of thedeceased. 

His property was sold at a sale on May 14, 1792, the proceeds of whichamounted to 84 pounds and one shilling and 10 Ω pence. TheAdministrator's itemized account of disbursements in the settlement ofthe estate show that he paid out fourteen shillings and six pence morethan the receipts of the sale. 

John was naturalized September 13, 1761 and it is therefore decidedthat he immigrated to America with his father from Alsace (where thefamily probably came from to this country). 

John's record carries eligibility to membership in the DAR. He wasprobably too old to fight, but he gave assistance to the Revolution,referred to as follows 

ANCESTOR'S SERVICES 
Assisting in the establishment of American Independence during the warof the Revolution were as follows. 

In a list of claims produced and ordered to be certified, County ofShenandoah, Virginia, Aug 29, 1782. 

John Wolfenberger for hire of a horse received. 
2 L 10 S 00 P 

The above information was taken from Public Service Claims ofShenandoah County, in the Virginia State Library at Richmond, and aphotostatic copy of the record may be obtained by making applicationto the Librarian and paying a nominal fee. 

In making application for DAR membership, reference may be made toNational No. 163783." W,M. Creasy 

"This person is the patriarch of the entire SPARGER - SPARGUR family.He moved to Surry County, NC in about 1776 where he changed his namefrom WOLFENBARGER or WOLFENSBERGER to SPARGER. 

He married Christina FREY daughter of Valentine FREY. See ChristinaFREY for information on her ancestors. 

All of his children were born in or near Surry County, NC. AfterChristina died he moved to Highland County, OH, with his son Henrywhere he joined three other of his sons Joseph, Reuben and Phillip,who had already settled there. 

The history of this John W. SPARGER must be credited to Mr W M Creasyof Wilmington, Delaware and Mr J B SPARGER of Mt Airy, NC. Mr SPARGERhad personally visited many of the court houses and obtained valuablerecords of the family. He also had the assistance of many genealogistsin Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Harrisburg, PA and Richmond, VA andvarious other places in the collection of this data. 

[notes by LMJones] 

2 2009 
Re page 10...John W. Spargur went to Ohio with [son] Henry W. andSusannah Roberts (Spargur) who were my gggrandparents and theirdaughter (my g grandmother) Maletha b, 24 Oct 1817. Henry W. andSusannah were married in , Surry, NC, 25 Oct 1816. Maletha marriedDaniel Roads 26 Feb 1837. I have a table they went to housekeepingwith. One of their sons was my grandfather John Q. Roads. email MKP 


THE SHENANDOAH COUNTY FARM/GLEBE/ALMS HOUSE 
THE POOR HOUSE FARM 

Program presented by Karen Cooper, Tuesday, September 12, 2006 

I knew I could not talk about the county farm without revealing my ownfeelings. I must begin by 
saying that the opinions I will express about the farm are notnecessarily those of the historical society, 
and the research for this speech is not all mine. WPA researcherslooked at the farm and the neighboring 
houses in the 30ís. Daniel Burner, Woodstockís former mayor, and FredPainter, the author of A Brief 
History of the Alms House, were two of the first men to research thehistory of the county farm. 
Woodstock Museum Archivist, Linda Varney, examined the farmís records.Lena Fuller, co-author of the 
recent commemorative program and historical guide for Woodstockís250th anniversary knows a good 
deal about the farm and the Maurertown area. The seemingly all-knowingcounty historian, Harry Long, 
left me a clear trail of information, and my mother, Rebecca Good,also helped me understand the 
political and social foundations for the farmís development. JeanAllen Davis, co-author of the history of 
Edinburg, helped me question some long accepted legends. Jean Martin,the county archivist, maintains 
a set of files about the farm in the county library. 
ìAlms house Crumblesî! ìSix families evacuated from shelter.î ìNeedfor repairs at 
county farm forces relocation of shelter residentsî. These were thehead lines the beginning of August 
when deterioration caused the collapse of an exterior brick wall ofthe old house at the county farm. Since 
1799, the former parish glebe has been a refuge for the homeless. Butnow it sits vacant while county 
officials weigh the costs of repair against its usefulness and thesentiment attached to the old place. 
Glebe, alms house, county farm, poor house ñ those are not veryfamiliar words. We know some 
of them from books and movies. Often in movies about old England, wehear the beggars on the street 
crying out, ìAlms for the poor!î So we know that alms means money wegive to help people who are in 
need. We donít hear much about county farms in the movies, but weremember that in The Christmas 
Carol, Scrooge has a pair of visitors, on Christmas Eve, who ask himto pledge some money to help the 
poor. Scrooge asks if there are no workhouses, and we get theimpression that a government work house 
isnít a very nice place. 
When I was a child, my father occasionally wired houses on weekends.He brought me along to 
hold the wire while he pulled the other end down into the basement ofthe house to hook it to the electrical 
panel. He and his friend Amos Ford worked together. They told me theyneeded to do some extra work, 
or we might end up going ìover the hill to the poor houseî. I wasnítsure what the poor house was, but I 
got the impression very early that it was important to work hard,because the poor house wasnít a place I 
wanted to go. By the way, is there a song about going over the hill tothe poor house? I gathered from 
my father that there was. When I got married, I learned that myhusbandís father actually lived on 
Warren Countyís Poor House Farm, because his father, Hezekiah Cooper,was the farmís last director. 
The Warren County farm was sold at least a half a century ago! 
Letís spend a few minutes examining early Virginia attitudes aboutpoverty, the poor laws for the 
Virginia Colony and the origins and history of our county farm. As wedo so, I think you will be 
impressed with our ancestors and predecessors. 
As soon as the first ships landed in Virginia, the colonial governmentbegan to set up a system of 
law and order. Early Virginia used the English system of counties andparishes. The county, like today, 
was the local governmental system that kept order, recordedtransactions and collected taxes. Counties 
were divided into districts, and each district was represented by ajustice. Justices worked with the sheriff 
and the county clerk to maintain up-to-date tax rolls and make surethe taxes were collected. They saw to 
the building and maintenance of the county court house, and theyassisted the county clerk in the 
production and collection of county records. Often the local militiacaptains were also justices, and many 
justices served on the parish vestry. The county justices alsosupported, and sometimes pressured the 
parish vestries in their duties to the parish.  2 
When the Virginia House of Burgesses set up a new county, they alsoorganized the people in that 
area into a new parish or parishes. Thus Shenandoah County was firstorganized as Dunmore County, and 
within the same boundaries it was also Beckford Parish. The House ofBurgesses generally consulted 
with the people in the area, before they set up these boundaries, andthe vestry members were supposed to 
be elected by the people they represented. 
Collecting the tithe was one of the vestryís most important jobs. Allparishioners were required to 
pay a tithe, or tax, to support the parish church. This church was theìestablished churchî or the Church 
of England. The parish vestrymen were responsible for maintaining thechurch properties and paying a 
minister. Parishes were required, by law, to provide a farm for theminister called a glebe. At times the 
law stated that a glebe should be no smaller than one hundred acres.This figure was later raised to two 
hundred, and then reduced again to one hundred. Some glebes were much,much larger. 
Until 1772, Shenandoah County (or Dunmore County, as it was thencalled) was part of Frederick 
County, and Beckford Parish fell within the bounds of FrederickParish. As the leaders from Frederick 
began to consider the best organization for a new county and parish,they faced an interesting dilemma ñ 
the area in question was full of people of German and Swiss descent!These German speakers needed a 
minister of German origin. But where could they find an Anglicanminister who spoke German? 
Fortunately, when they posed their question to the father of theLutheran Church in America, he just 
happened to have a son, Peter, who needed a job. In 1771, the peopleof Beckford Parish, in the newly 
organizing county of Dunmore, sent a proposal to Peter Muhlenberg.They offered to give him the new 
position as Rector of Beckford Parish if he would travel to London toreceive ordination as an Anglican 
minister. You know the rest of that story. Muhlenberg received hisordination from the Bishop of 
London, April 25, 1772, and returned to the Shenandoah Valley. Therehe met with the new Beckford 
Parish Vestry composed of the following members: Burr Harrison, JohnWolfenberger, Joseph Pugh, 
John Tipton, Henry Nelson, Abraham Keller, Jacob Holdman, HenryFravel, Philip Hoofman and 
Frederick Sonner. Four of these men were actually true members of theAnglican Church! Burr Harrison 
and Henry Nelson were Anglicans from Eastern Virginia. John Tipton wasa Maryland Anglican, while 
Joseph Pugh once had rented a pew in the Anglican Church in Lancaster,Pennsylvania. We can identify 
at least five more of these men as Germans. 
The church wardens had promised Muhlenberg an income comparable to twohundred and fifty 
pounds Pennsylvania Currency, and they told him they would supply himwith a house and farm ìof at 
least two hundred acres of extreme good landî. 
In 1774, the vestrymen of Beckford Parish (including all of the aboveexcept 
Wolfenberger, along with George Keller, Lawrence Snapp and TavenerBeale) made good on their word 
when their two representatives, Joseph Pugh and George Keller,purchased two tracts of land in the 
Maurertown area. The first piece of land consisted of one hundred andeighty-nine acres and was 
purchased from John George Storm and Barbara for four hundred andforty pounds Virginia money. The 
second tract of forty-three acres cornered the first. It was obtainedfrom John and Delilah Mauck for 
twenty pounds of current money. 
The names of Joseph Pugh and George Keller tell us something about theorganization of the 
vestry. Virginia law required the election of at least twelvevestrymen. The vestry then selected a smaller 
number to act as church wardens. Joseph Pugh and George Keller wereacting in that capacity when they 
bought the Glebe, but both these men held other significant jobs inthe county government. Joseph Pugh 
was an honest to goodness Anglican. He was actually born in ChesterCounty, Pennsylvania in a Quaker 
household, but he chose to marry an Anglican wife. The Quakersdisowned him, and he spent the rest of 
his life as an Anglican. George Keller, on the other hand, was ofGerman descent. Undoubtedly, the 
vestry selected one church warden to represent the Englishmen in thecommunity, and the other church 
warden represented those of German background. This religiouscooperation would remain a hallmark of 
community relations in Shenandoah County for many years. 
The parish vestry had other duties we would find strange or annoyingtoday. Indeed, it is now 
politically incorrect to think that our early Virginia ancestors gaveus much of value, and their Anglican 
Church has had terrible press in the past few years. Last summer, BillClinton, referred to Episcopalians,  3 
the descendents of the Anglicans as ìthe frozen chosenî. But I thinkBill needs to read some history. 
Perhaps the attitude toward our early Virginia ancestors will softenas we celebrate the four hundredth 
birthday of our Commonwealth next year? 
Virginia law required that vestries take up a tax or tithe, not onlyto maintain the church and the 
minister, but also to care for the parish poor. The entire basis forour beliefs about poverty came from the 
English view of the poor as it was expressed in the parish system.Virginians believed that there would 
always be poor among them, and they thought that most of these peopledeserved and required a certain 
amount of help. Early Virginians categorized the poor according totheir needs. Some poor people 
simply could not work. They were either too old, or they had somemisfortune that prevented them from 
making a living. Those people couldnít help their condition, and thelaws ordered that the old and infirm 
be sustained and comforted. Since Virginia was a rural colony, workhouses were not generally a popular 
solution, so people in the community housed and fed these indigent.These providers were then 
reimbursed by the vestry. 
The parish laws recognized a second set of poor, these were childrenwho were born out of 
wedlock and who had no fathers. In a patriarchal, rural society, achild without a father required a lot of 
attention, so these children were usually taken from their mothers andindentured to a farmer or craftsman 
in the community for quite a long time. Sometimes they were in serviceuntil the age of thirty! I believe 
our ancestors suspected that without a long and thorough period ofsupervision, these children might grow 
up to be immoral like their parents. The mothers of these ìbastardsîmay have received some financial 
support, but it usually came with a good whipping in the publicsquare! The vestry did not set the 
punishment; they identified the problem, and then turned the womanover to the county justices to mete 
out the medicine. 
There were also orphans and others in the community who weretemporarily down on their luck. 
Perhaps a family had lost their house to fire, or they were thevictims of an epidemic. Revolutionary 
soldiers left orphans and widows, or were just away for so long theycouldnít make a living. If the vestry 
determined that a person or family needed temporary help, theyprovided it, but only for as long as it was 
needed. Again, ordinary citizens stepped in to help theseunfortunates. Orphans, who had once belonged 
to families, were indentured, but the period of indentureship was muchless ñ until the age of eighteen or 
twenty-one. Most of them were taken in by relatives or neighbors. 
Finally, Virginians recognized that some people were genuinely lazy,and they took steps to force 
those people to take care of themselves and their families. Vagrantsand dead beat dads found themselves 
indentured or escorted out of the parish. Their wives and childrenwere taken away from them and 
received some form of aid. For example, it was ordered that John Simmsand wife be summoned to 
appear at the next court to show cause if any they have why theirchildren ought not to be bound out by 
the church wardens of this parish. 
Did this system work? The answer is that usually, yes it did. Vestrymen were not only 
responsible for finding people to take care of the poor, and forpaying those people, but they were also 
supposed to check, from time to time, for any signs of abuse orneglect. In 1776, the vestry heard a 
complaint against John North that he was abusive to his indenturedservant, Soloman Carrier. North was 
the coroner, a militia captain, and a county justice. But that didnítprotect him from the law. The parish 
learned that another prominent citizen had fathered a bastard child,and they insisted that he put up a 
substantial bond as a promise that this child would not become aburden to the parish. If the vestrymen 
slacked off on their duties, the county justices were supposed to stepin and order them to get to work! In 
1778, thirty-one men sent a petition to the Virginia House ofBurgesses asking for a vestry election, 
because they said the Beckford Parish Vestry was neglecting itsduties. Several of these men were 
actually vestry members, and several more held important countyoffices. Ordinary citizens could also be 
watchdogs for the unfortunate. The citizens in the Fort, for example,signed a petition, to remove a 
neighbor from the tax rolls because they said he had been an invalidfor months, and they thought his 
health would not improve. There are other references from the courtminutes where the church wardens 
asked that children be indentured by the county justices so they couldlearn a trade. Orphans became 
wagon-makers, weavers, tailors, farmers etc. Often their contractssaid they should be taught to read,  4 
write and cipher. Occasionally, a contract for indenture shows up inthe county records, and we can read 
exactly what the master was expected to do for his charge. Forexample, in 1778, the justices ordered that 
John and Cary Bernaw, orphans of William Bernaw, be bound to WilliamHand till they are at the age of 
twenty-one years and that the said William Hand at the time of theirfreedom do give each of the said 
orphans a horse saddle and bridle to the value of sixteen pounds, awarm suit of cloaths and educate them 
as the law requires. Simultaneously, Henry Hand took in Enis andAugustine Roberts, baseborn children 
of Ann Roberts. He was required to give them the same treatment. So inthis case, orphans were orphans 
despite their background. (Before Dan Bly began his series From theRhine to the Shenandoah, he read 
all the orphanís bonds and compiled a list. This list is available inthe county library.) 
Because vestrymen were caring for people in their own communities withhelp from their 
neighbors, they knew who really needed help. Overall, the vestryrecords in Virginia indicate that food 
was plentiful, and that only a few people needed assistance- at leastuntil the Revolution. 
While we have few vestry records for Beckford Parish, the records forFrederick Parish are intact, 
and they tell us quite a bit about care for the poor in our area ofthe Shenandoah Valley. For example, in 
1764, the Parish levy totaled 216,720 pounds of tobacco. In money thiswas between six and seven pence 
per tithable. The vestrymen used some of this money to build a poorhouse in Winchester. They were 
also building a church. Cornalius Ruddell, who was from present dayShenandoah County, was one of the 
vestrymen. John Ruddell was paid as a reader on North River. Ruddellwas probably leading a 
congregation as they read from the Prayer Book. The North River Chapelwas at Rudeís Hill near Mt 
Jackson. 
There were bills for medicines, nursing, a coffin and burial. ThomasSmith supplied several poor 
people with bread. Some people were given money directly, and somewere boarded with families in the 
community. The parish had a secretary and an attorney. The records donot tell us exactly how many 
needy sought help, but, in 1764, it appears that there were less thanthirty of them in an area that would 
have included Frederick, Berkeley, Jefferson, Clarke, Shenandoah,Warren Counties and part of Page 
County today. 
Only a few names appear in the records for Shenandoah people. In 1767,George Appler, 
probably of Woodstock, was removed from the tax rolls because he wastoo infirm. Nicholas Sehorn was 
reimbursed because he took care of Catherine Ott, in 1768 and 1769.These were the only notes I could 
find for us. Perhaps our thrifty Germans were all doing well, or theywere taking care of each other? 
With the American Revolution, the parish system fell apart. In 1776, apetition for religious 
freedom circulated throughout Virginia, and at least ten thousand mensigned it. The petition was 
presented to the Virginia House of Delegates by Thomas Jefferson.Basically, the document asked that 
the citizens of Virginia be freed from taxes to support the Church ofEngland and be permitted to establish 
their own churches. They wished that all churches be equal in the eyesof the government. (By the way, 
the Daughters of the American Revolution view a signature on thispetition as proof of patriotism, and 
they accept members who descend from a signer of the petition.) Thepetition, which is housed in the 
Library of Virginia, has been published in the Virginia GenealogicalSociety Quarterly. There are few 
German signatures, and they are very hard to read. It appears that thepetitions were circulated in many 
Presbyterian and Baptist Churches, but the German communities seemedto be very underrepresented as 
do the Methodists and Quakers. 
Once we had no parish system, we had no way to provide for the poor.Generally, the county 
justices assumed some of the duties of the old vestries. County taxespaid people to care for their poor 
neighbors. In 1780, Frederick County appointed Overseers for the Poor,and Shenandoah County decided 
to ask the legislature for permission to do the same. In May, 1782,the Virginia General Assembly gave 
the county authority to elect Overseers of the Poor. The act orderedthe vestry to settle its accounts for 
maintenance of the poor with the newly elected overseers, by the firstof January. The overseers should 
have come to court to take the oath and post bond, but I have beenunable to find references for them. 
Our citizens also came up with a very unique idea. Their minister,Peter Muhlenberg was gone. 
Their glebe was vacant, and it was not likely that the Anglicans inShenandoah County would ever be able 
to support a minister because they were too few in number. So,December 14, 1798, the inhabitants of  5 
Shenandoah County presented a petition to the Virginia GeneralAssembly and asked that they be 
permitted to keep their glebe for the sole benefit of the countyíspoor. This is what they said: 
ìThat the Glebe land in the parish of Beckford in the said County ofShenandoah was paid 
for by the Inhabitants of the said County That the buildings andimprovements of the said Glebe are now 
wasting and going to ruin. That there are now and always have been butfew of the Episcopalian 
persuasion in the said county and the Church Wardens and others whoprofess themselves of the 
Episcopal Church in the said County of Shenandoah are of that liberaldisposition as becometh free men 
and Americans and say that one Denomination of Christians and menought not have any separate 
privileges or Emoluments over others and therefore are willing thatthe said Glebe land should be 
appropriated to some Charitable purpose so as to benefit the goodpeople of the said County of 
Shenandoah and for that purpose have joined with the rest of theirfellow Citizens in this Petition. 
Wherefore it is our prayer of your Petitioners that the GeneralAssembly will pass and act appropriating 
the Glebe lands in the said County heretofore claimed by theProtestant Episcopal Church with the 
appurtenances thereunto belonging for the sole use and benefit of thepoor of the said county under the 
directions of such persons as your Honorable House in your Wisdom maydirect.î 
The petition was signed first by the church wardens, Abraham Bird andWilliam Aylett Booth. 
This suggests to us that we still had a vestry, in 1798. It alsoindicates that the partnership between 
Germans and English was still working, because Abraham Bird was notactually of English descent ñ 
although his name sounds English. Shenandoah County residents, fromvarious parts of the county, 
signed beneath the churchwardens. Many of the signatures are inGerman: Philip Kibler, Johannes 
Pence, George Fetzer, Andrew Bushong, Michael Koontz, Mathias Zehring.Some are signed in English, 
but we know the men were from German families like George Fravel,Godfrey Wilkins, Jacob Parrot, 
Daniel Hisey, Nicholas Keffer, John Huddle, John Wiseman and ConradWakeman. Finally, there are 
English names like William Richardson, James Russell and Samuel Way.(Handley Library has a copy of 
this petition, and it is available on the Library of VirginiaWebsite.) 
The Virginia government had been agonizing over the ownership of theparish glebes for several 
years. For some time, it looked as if they would turn these farms overto the Episcopal churches. But, in 
1799, the Virginia General Assembly passed and act that gave theBeckford Parish Glebe to Shenandoah 
County ìto dispose of or appropriate upon such terms and in suchmanner as they may judge best for the 
poor of the parish of BeckfordÖî. In other counties, the GeneralAssembly ordered the sale of glebes, 
and the proceeds to go for the benefit of the county. In 1804, theUnited States Supreme Court did 
interfere for Christ Church and forbade the sale their glebe. But itappears that Shenandoah County was 
the only county to turn its glebe into a county farm. 
So just what did the county have to work with when it established thefarm as a home for the 
poor? Probably not much! Peter Muhlenbergís wife and children lived onthe farm, until 1783, but 
Muhlenberg was away at war. An overseer was selected to run the farm,but this might not have been a 
very satisfactory solution. Once, Mrs. Muhlenberg wrote to her husbandthat the overseer had left her, 
and she had no one to help her run the farm. (In all fairness to theoverseer, he didnít really run away, he 
enlisted and went to fight!) When General Muhlenberg asked GeorgeWashington for permission to 
return home to take care of his family, Washington refused to granthim leave, because he said Peter 
Muhlenberg was too valuable, and he could not be spared. WhenWashington finally allowed Peter 
Muhlenberg to return to the Valley, it was not to look after his ownaffairs, rather Muhlenberg was 
ordered to raise and supply and entire new army! Peter Muhlenbergprobably had little time to attend to 
domestic matters. 
Did the Muhlenberg family actually live on the glebe? Muhlenberg hadpurchased the lot across 
from the court house in Woodstock from Mathias Zehring. The old logchapel, where he preached, 
actually sat in the middle of the street between his house and thecourt house in such a way that traffic 
circled the church as it moved up and down Main Street. It might havemade more sense for Muhlenberg 
and his family to have spent their entire stay in Beckford Parish in ahouse near the church. But it does 
appear that there had been a log and brick house on the Glebe Farm,prior to 1800. In the 1930ís the 
WPA surveyed some of the old buildings in Shenandoah County. When theyexamined the Fanny Leary  6 
Home on Main Street in Maurertown, they recorded that the old housewas an early structure of log and 
straw brick construction. The beams were hand hewn. The pinefloorboards of irregular widths, and 
other architectural features, indicated that the house was really old.Lena Fuller thinks that this Fanny 
Leary House was indeed the Muhlenberg Home from their arrival in theShenandoah Valley, in 1772, 
until their departure, in 1783, and that it was moved to its MainStreet location from the county farm. 
In 1979, Painter published his history of the Alms House. Mr. Painterwas of the opinion that the 
only building left from Muhlebergís time was the limestone springhouse. The spring house door was 
held in place by strap hinges. The hinges crossed the entire width ofthe door, and the door frame was 
held in place by wooden pins. 
There is an architectural survey of the farm in the Shenandoah CountyArchives. It seems to have been produced by Shenandoah CountyísPreservation Committee, in the 1970ís. But I believe it is a copy of aWPA file. The survey describes an ìodd shaped rambling institution Öithas been built to at different times. It has five sections, three ofwhich are one story, connected with two two-story sections. Longporches with railing balusters and champed post run the entire lengthof the house, with additional side and back porches of the same type.A general appearance of bleakness prevails throughout.î The main partof the house was constructed of pointed brick. There were 32 rooms ñ29 large and three small, and 13 brickchimneys listed in this survey.The house was listed as in good condition. Fred Painter said thisstructure was built, in 1839. This is the building that remains on thefarm today. Mr. Painter found three account books for the BeckfordParish Alms House. Two of them were in private hands. Thanks to Fred,they were placed in the County Archives - which was then under thecare of the Woodstock Museum. Now they are in the Shenandoah CountyTruban Archives in the Shenandoah County Library. Thanks to LindaVarney, they have also been microfilmed, and there is a copy of thatfilm in the County Library. 
The first account book for the Alms House covered the period from 1799to 1817. It began with instructions from Mr. Alex Pollock on how tolay out the records in the book. The account book opens with atouching note that Margaret Carrol was received at the poor house byorder of the court, and that she brought with her a small wooden boxwith old clothes, an old blanket and two old razors. She needed allnew clothes. 
The records continue to tell us about some of the people who came tothe house, and they are full of sales and purchases. The residentsworked around the farm to raise wheat, rye, corn and oats. They madehay, hulled beans, and they stored away potatoes and dried apples.They sold wool, and they raised their own flax so they could weavecloth. Sometimes they raised their own livestock including sheep, cowsand pigs as well as fowl. They sold soap. Basically, the residents dideverything they could to be self sufficient. But the farm had topurchase some necessities. There were orders for nails and shingles torepair the buildings. The residents enjoyed their pipes and tobacco,their chocolate and coffee with sugar. Some of them needed spectacles.Sometimes they hired a blacksmith or a shoemaker. Tools had to bereplaced, and the women required needles and scissors. The doctorcame, the ministers kept up scheduled services, and sometimes thecoffin maker made a visit. 
Everybody at the farm pitched in as much as they could. In 1914; theoverseers of the poor asked the Board of Supervisors, upon the adviceof Dr. D. L. Shaver, for an artificial limb for Joe Riffey. This wouldenable him to be of some service, as a hand on the farm. The limb wasnot to exceed $25.00. The farm also hired many workers and craftsmen,because the residents could not keep up with all the farm work. Thisallowed many men in the community to earn additional income. Theoverseers of the poor also parceled out farm animals all around thecounty. A Mr. McCauley kept six cattle on his land at Cedar Creek,while some animals grazed the hillsides of the Fort until they wererounded up for slaughter. 
In some cases, entire families spent most, or all, their lives at thefarm. The last residents remained there until late in the 20thCentury. Then, in 1989, the Shenandoah County Alliance for Shelterorganized to aid homeless county families. The alliance is a nonprofit organization and is funded by federal and state grants. Peoplefrom several churches, including some Episcopalians, were instrumentalin the formation of the alliance. The alliance has been able to offertemporary housing to homeless  7county families. Families may stay aslong as two years, but most are able to get back on their feet inthree to six months. While the alliance is now willing to take peoplefrom other places in Virginia, all their clients have come fromShenandoah County. Last year, they provided 4, 400 nights of shelterfor the homeless.. The rural atmosphere provided a place of calm forpeople in turmoil. The fenced yard was a good place for children toplay. 
Just a few weeks before the exterior wall collapsed, $30,000 worth ofbathroom renovations were completed in the old home. The Alliance forShelter hopes the county will see fit to fix the old building, butrepairs wonít be cheap. Since the farm is listed on the NationalRegister of Historic Places, the county needs to call in anarchitectural historian to access the damage, and offer some advice.It would seem that if the county decided to sell the farm, they wouldbe breaking the law if they allowed even one cent of the sale money tobe spent on anything other than the countyís poor. The GeneralAssembly Act in 1799 was pretty clear on that subject. 
As the glebe, the old farm was once part of the story of a group ofpeople who chose to work together to provide moral guidance for theircommunity. It is a symbol of how Anglicans, Lutherans and Reformedcame together to give their county a minister. Peter Muhlenberg was anexceptional man and an awesome general! But he would have been a hero,even if he had not been a military man, because he represented whatpeople can do when they cooperate. The glebe farm should remind us ofthat. Then the farm became a symbol of how those people thought abouttaking care of the poor. It became the only glebe in the state to bereborn as a county poor house farm. Now, like the old limestone courthouse, it is a symbol that belongs to all county citizens. It standsfor what our ancestors believed about caring for the indigent. Theysaid it in writing, and then they made it work for a couple hundredyears! Yes, they believed in hard work; they didnít send just anyoneìover the hill to the poor houseî. Sometimes people say to me, I donítwant to help the poor. I donít want to pay the taxes. I think about myancestors. I think about how they took in the homeless and fed thewidows. I think about how they nursed the old people through theirlast days. I wonder what would have happened to those who found a homeon the county farm? Does it matter what our ancestors thought and whatthey believed in? If it does, what do we do now? What do we do withthe artifacts they left behind? If our ancestors could communicatewith each other across their language barrier and cooperate to makegood things happen in this county, canít we do the same thing? 

See history of Shenandoah County Virginia pages8,45,95,96,124,131-134,709-713. Also references John, Peter, Benjamin Wolfenbarger pg231, and John(Johannes) Wolfenbarger/Wolfensberger Jn asVestryman-Beckford Parish pg 523 

The writings of W. M. Creasy make no mention of Revolutionary Warservice for John W. Sparger (1754-1840). 
For his father (John Wolfersberger, 1730-1788, m. Hannah Summer), thefollowing notes are in W. M. Creasy's records 
====================================================================================== 

It is very clear that he adopted the spelling WOLFENBARGER after hewent to Shenandoah County, VA, some time prior to 1771. See thecomments under Peter (#333) for the identification of his wife asHannah. No record of John is found in Pennsylvania after thetransaction concerning land formerly belonging to his father John(#367), but reference is found in the History of Shenandoah County,VA, by John W. Wayland on page 523, where John Wolfenberger (Note theywere all called Wolfenbergers in Shenandoah County) with others tookoath as Vestrymen in Beckford Parish on March 6, 1771. It will beshown later that this John was the father of John who settled in NorthCarolina and is without doubt the "man named Wolfesperger who formerlylived near Lititz but is now in Virginia" mentioned in the MoravianRecords in North Carolina in December 1776. 

It should be explained that while the Wolfersbergers were Lutheransand Reformed Church people, the office of Vestryman in the EpiscopalChurch, which was the established Church in Virginia at that time, wasfrequently conferred upon members of other denominations because therewere probably not enough Episcopalians in the Parish to fill theoffices of Vestrymen. It is explained by a genealogist that this wasoften the case, the Lutheran Church being the established Church inGermany or at least the favored church of the governing classes, itwas most natural to appoint a Lutheran or Reformed as a Vestryman. TheLutheran and Reformed always had joint churches in these parts.Muhlenberg, the Lutheran minister at Woodstock where John Wolfenbargerlived, was ordained an Episcopal minister in order that he mightperform marriages. 

John Wolfenbarger purchased land in Shehandoah County, VA, June 51781. Deed Book C p. 433, Deed Book K p. 496. Sept 29, 17?5 thefollowing record is found Peter Wolfenberger and Susan his wife,Frederick and Catherine his wife, Phillipp Wolfenbarger and Hannah hiswife, Martin Miller and Mary his wife, Jacob Wolfenbarger and Nancyhis wife, of Shenandoah County, VA, and JOHN WOLFENBARGER ANDCHRISTINA HIS WIFE, of Surry County, NC, children and heirs childrenand heirs deceased, to Benjamin Wolfenberger of the County ofShenandoah, two lots in the town of Woodstock of which JohnWolfenberger died seized and possessed, known as lots 4 and 76 beingthe same lots one half acre each which were conveyed by Nounce Byrdand Clara his wife to Peter Wolfenberger by deed of lease and releaseMay 24, 1780. Benjamin Wolfenberger who bought the land from theestate was also one of John's sons and qualified as Administrator ofhis estate. According to the final settlement filed with the CourtSept 10, 1792, he died about Nov 18, 1788 and in the record ofdisbursement is an item paid David Jordan (School Master), sixshillings for reading the funeral service at the burial of thedeceased. 

His property was sold at a sale on May 14, 1792, the proceeds of whichamounted to 84 pounds and one shilling and 10 ½ pence. TheAdministrator's itemized account of disbursements in the settlement ofthe estate show that he paid out fourteen shillings and six pence morethan the receipts of the sale. 

John was naturalized September 13, 1761 and it is therefore decidedthat he immigrated to America with his father from Alsace (where thefamily probably came from to this country). 

John's record carries eligibility to membership in the DAR. He wasprobably too old to fight, but he gave assistance to the Revolution,referred to as follows 

ANCESTOR'S SERVICES 
My ancestor's services in assisting in the establishment of AmericanIndependence during the war of the Revolution were as follows. 

In a list of claims produced and ordered to be certified, County ofShenandoah, Virginia, Aug 29, 1782. 

John Wolfenberger for hire of a horse received. 
2 L 10 S 00 P 

The above information was taken from Public Service Claims ofShenandoah County, in the Virginia State Library at Richmond, and aphotostatic copy of the record may be obtained by making applicationto the Librarian and paying a nominal fee. 

In making application for DAR membership, reference may be made toNational No. 163783." W,M. Creasy 

"This person is the patriarch of the entire SPARGER - SPARGUR family.He moved to Surry County, NC in about 1776 where he changed his namefrom WOLFENBARGER or WOLFENSBERGER to SPARGER. 

He married Christina FREY daughter of Valentine FREY. See ChristinaFREY for information on her ancestors. 

All of his children were born in or near Surry County, NC. AfterChristina died he moved to Highland County, OH, with his son Henrywhere he joined three other of his sons Joseph, Reuben and Phillip,who had already settled there. 

The history of this John W. SPARGER must be credited to Mr W M Creasyof Wilmington, Delaware and Mr J B SPARGER of Mt Airy, NC. Mr SPARGERhad personally visited many of the court houses and obtained valuablerecords of the family. He also had the assistance of many genealogistsin Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Harrisburg, PA and Richmond, VA andvarious other places in the collection of this data. 

[notes by LMJones] 

2 2009 
Re page 10...John W. Spargur went to Ohio with [son] Henry W. andSusannah Roberts (Spargur) who were my gggrandparents and theirdaughter (my g grandmother) Maletha b, 24 Oct 1817. Henry W. andSusannah were married in , Surry, NC, 25 Oct 1816. Maletha marriedDaniel Roads 26 Feb 1837. I have a table they went to housekeepingwith. One of their sons was my grandfather John Q. Roads. email MKP 

John W. (Sparger) Wolfensberger was an 18th Century church vestrymanand Virginia and North Carolina settler. 
John Sparger, who shortened his name from Wolfenberger, was the son ofJohn Wolfenberger and grandson of Johan Wolfersberger, the immigrantwho came to America from Germany. John was born 17 Aug 1754 inHeidelberg, Lebanon, Pennsylvania just outside of what is todaySchaeferstown, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It was a German farmingcommunity centered around the Morovian Church. His father moved thefamily west to Shenandoah County, Virginia around 1769. 
He adopted the spelling Wolfenbarger after he moved to ShenandoahCounty, VA. John with others took oath as Vestrymen in BeckfordParish, Shenandoah, Virginia on March 6, 1771. A Vestryman was not aclergy but rather an official. He may have had the role of supervisinglocal parish public services, such as the workhouse, administration ofpoor relief, or the keeping of parish records (baptisms, deaths andmarriages) and so on. It should be explained that while theWolfersbergers were Lutherans and Reformed Church people, the officeof Vestryman in the Episcopal Church, which was the established Churchin Virginia at that time, was frequently conferred upon members ofother denominations because there were probably not enoughEpiscopalians in the Parish to fill the offices of Vestrymen.According to land records, John Wolfenbarger purchased land inShehandoah County, VA, June 5 1781 - two lots in the town ofWoodstock. 
In 1776 as the Revolution was heating up John Muhlenberg the pastor atthe Anglican church located in the heart of Woodstock gave a famousspeech from the pulpit.  At conclusion of his farewell sermon onJanuary 21, 1776, Muhlenberg threw off his clerical robes to reveal anofficer's uniform beneath and shouted, "there is a time to pray and atime to fight..." With that declaration, the story says he then calledfor volunteers to join the 8th Virginia Regiment under his command.John was probably too old to fight in the American Revolution, but hegave assistance to the Patriots. John W. Sparger and his father JohnJohannes Wolfersberger/Wolfenbarger Jr.were both patriots even thoughthey didn't serve in the Continental Army. Both of them  provided horse/s, stabling, and hay for the Army, according to Virginia PublikClaims records. They are also considered Patriots of the AmericanRevolution by the Daughters of the American Revolution for providingthat assistance. John's younger brother Philip joined the militia andfought in the Battle of Cowpens. 
John got involved with the Frey Family from his home town inPennsylvania. Apparently when they moved to North Carolina he movedwith them. In 1773, a planned community called the FriedbergSettlement, in what is present-day Davidson County outside ofWinston-Salem was attracting settlers from Pennsylvania through theMorovian Church. 
About 1778, John married a woman named Christina Frey in FriedbergSettlement, Surry, North Carolina.  John sold his property inWoodstock on May 14, 1792 and at this time probably moved to NorthCarolina permanently. In fact, when his father's grave was beingthreatened by the construction of a new courthouse in Woodstock, VA hedid not answer the call to collect his father's remains. To this dayhis father's remains are on the property off Main Street somewhere. 
John Sparger moved 250 miles south to an area known as Wachovia, theland the Moravian Church had purchased, was very much on the frontier,and most of the roads of the North Carolina colony were little morethan paths through primeval forests. Some would walk 14 miles tochurch. 
Sometime after his marriage he changed his name to John W. Sparger andnamed his children Reuben W. Sparger, Joseph W. Sparger, etc. Thestory told about this name change is as follows: The sheriff called onJohn to serve a warrant calling John for jury duty. As many others, hehad trouble with names of some of the Moravians that lived in theCounty. The warrant was made out in the name of John W. Sparger.Apparently, John liked this change in name. When his children grew toadults, some of them resettled in Highland Co. Ohio and changed thespelling to Spargur. The reason for this change is not made clear.Those that remained in North Carolina retained the Sparger spelling.Among those who stayed in North Carolina was John W. Sparger (Jr.) whomarried Sarah Lyon about 1816. After John's wife. Christina, died,Rueben Spargur returned to North Carolina and took his father back toOhio with him. John W. Sparger died 17 Nov 1840 in Paint, Highland,Ohio. He was buried in Stringtown, Highland, Ohio. His descendantspurchased a new grave stone at the New Stringtown Cemetery whichreflects the name changes to link the families looking for theirorigins. 

Sources: Daughters of the American Revolution National No. 163783,Public Service Claims of Shenandoah County, in the Virginia StateLibrary at Richmond Aug 29, 1782-"John Wolfenberger for hire of ahorse received" ,history of Shenandoah County Virginia pages8,45,95,96,124, 131-134,709-713. Also references John, Peter, BenjaminWolfenbarger pg 231, and John(Johannes) Wolfenbarger/Wolfensberger Jnas Vestryman-Beckford Parish pg 523, VA Early Census Index 1783Shenandoah Tax List, OH 1840 Pensioners List - Paint, Highland County,Ohio, Wolfensberger Family Association historian 

Children 
1 John W SPARGER b: 1778 in Friedberg, , NC 
2 Reuben W SPARGER b: 17 May 1779 in , Surry, NC 
3 Joseph W SPARGUR b: 1 Mar 1781 in Friedburg, Surry, NC 
4 Hannah W SPARGER b: Abt 1785 in , Surry, NC 
5 Phillipp W SPARGER b: Abt 1786 in , Surry, NC 
6 Henry W SPARGUR b: 1 Dec 1789 in , Surry, NC 
7 William W SPARGER b: 1797 in , Surry, NC 
8 Nancy W SPARGER b: 1801 in , Surry, NC 
9 Sally W SPARGER b: 1803 in , Surry, NC 

John Sparger Wolfersberger, born August 17, 1754 in Lebanon Pa.; diedNovember 17, 1840 in Highland County Ohio.He was the son of 168. John(Wolfensparger) Wolfensberger and 169. Hannah Summer.He married 85.Christina (Christiana) Frey 1777 in Friedberg, Surry, N.C.. 
85.Christina (Christiana) Frey, born November 22, 1759 in Near What isNow Heidlersburg, Adams Co., PA?; died Abt. 1833 in N.C..She was thedaughter of 170. Johann Valentin Frey and 171. Ann Maria Binchell neeBinckele. 
Children of John Wolfersberger and Christina Frey are: 

i. 

John W. Jr. or II Spargur, born Abt. 1778 in Near Mount Airy,Friedgerg, N.C.; died 1840; married Sarah Lyon. 

ii. 

Reuben Spargur, born May 17, 1779 in Surry, N.C.; died 1815 in NearMount Airy, N.C.. 

iii. 

Hannah W. Sparger, born 1781 in Surry, N.C.; married William A.Deatherage. 

42 
iv. 

Joseph Wolfenbsarger Spargur, born March 01, 1781 in Surry Co., NC;died March 06, 1845 in Highland Co., OH; married (1) Rachel Sumner May1801 in N.C.; married (2) Abigail Moore December 26, 1823 in HighlandOhio. 

v. 

Phillip W. Spargur, born Abt. 1786 in Surry Co., Wolfensparger? N.C.;died January 31, 1855 in Highland Ohio; married Rachel Summer August14, 1807 in Surry Co., N.C.. 

vi. 

Henry W. Srargur, born Abt. 1789. 

vii. 

William W. Spargur, born 1796 in Surry, N.C.; died Bef. 1840 in NearFayetteville, N.C.; married Nancy Ann Bryson July 06, 1817. 

viii. 

Nancy W. Spargur, born Abt. 1801; married Jackson. 

ix. 

Sallie W. Spargur, born Abt. 1803 in Surry, N.C.; married Jackson. 

John (Sparger) WOLFENBARGER 
Given Name: John (Sparger) 
Surname: WOLFENBARGER 
Sex: M 
Birth: 17 Aug 1754 in , Lebanon, PA 
Death: 17 Nov 1840 in , Highland, OH 
Burial: , Highland, OH 1 
_UID: FCBAEB62B3EB41DAB89C216B3893E22D7696 
Change Date: 21 Feb 2009 at 10:53 
Note: 
re: Jacob Mueller, died 1776 
See history of Shenandoah County Virginia pages8,45,95,96,124,131-134,709-713. Also references John, Peter, Benjamin Wolfenbarger pg231, and John(Johannes) Wolfenbarger/Wolfensberger Jn asVestryman-Beckford Parish pg 523 

The writings of W. M. Creasy make no mention of Revolutionary Warservice for John W. Sparger (1754-1840). 

For his father (John Wolfersberger, 1730-1788, m. Hannah Summer), thefollowing notes are in W. M. Creasy's records 
====================================================================================== 

It is very clear that he adopted the spelling WOLFENBARGER after hewent to Shenandoah County, VA, some time prior to 1771. See thecomments under Peter (#333) for the identification of his wife asHannah. No record of John is found in Pennsylvania after thetransaction concerning land formerly belonging to his father John(#367), but reference is found in the History of Shenandoah County,VA, by John W. Wayland on page 523, where John Wolfenberger (Note theywere all called Wolfenbergers in Shenandoah County) with others tookoath as Vestrymen in Beckford Parish on March 6, 1771. It will beshown later that this John was the father of John who settled in NorthCarolina and is without doubt the "man named Wolfesperger who formerlylived near Lititz but is now in Virginia" mentioned in the MoravianRecords in North Carolina in December 1776. 

It should be explained that while the Wolfersbergers were Lutheransand Reformed Church people, the office of Vestryman in the EpiscopalChurch, which was the established Church in Virginia at that time, wasfrequently conferred upon members of other denominations because therewere probably not enough Episcopalians in the Parish to fill theoffices of Vestrymen. It is explained by a genealogist that this wasoften the case, the Lutheran Church being the established Church inGermany or at least the favored church of the governing classes, itwas most natural to appoint a Lutheran or Reformed as a Vestryman. TheLutheran and Reformed always had joint churches in these parts.Muhlenberg, the Lutheran minister at Woodstock where John Wolfenbargerlived, was ordained an Episcopal minister in order that he mightperform marriages. 

John Wolfenbarger purchased land in Shehandoah County, VA, June 51781. Deed Book C p. 433, Deed Book K p. 496. Sept 29, 17?5 thefollowing record is found Peter Wolfenberger and Susan his wife,Frederick and Catherine his wife, Phillipp Wolfenbarger and Hannah hiswife, Martin Miller and Mary his wife, Jacob Wolfenbarger and Nancyhis wife, of Shenandoah County, VA, and JOHN WOLFENBARGER ANDCHRISTINA HIS WIFE, of Surry County, NC, children and heirs childrenand heirs deceased, to Benjamin Wolfenberger of the County ofShenandoah, two lots in the town of Woodstock of which JohnWolfenberger died seized and possessed, known as lots 4 and 76 beingthe same lots one half acre each which were conveyed by Nounce Byrdand Clara his wife to Peter Wolfenberger by deed of lease and releaseMay 24, 1780. Benjamin Wolfenberger who bought the land from theestate was also one of John's sons and qualified as Administrator ofhis estate. According to the final settlement filed with the CourtSept 10, 1792, he died about Nov 18, 1788 and in the record ofdisbursement is an item paid David Jordan (School Master), sixshillings for reading the funeral service at the burial of thedeceased. 

His property was sold at a sale on May 14, 1792, the proceeds of whichamounted to 84 pounds and one shilling and 10 ½ pence. TheAdministrator's itemized account of disbursements in the settlement ofthe estate show that he paid out fourteen shillings and six pence morethan the receipts of the sale. 

John was naturalized September 13, 1761 and it is therefore decidedthat he immigrated to America with his father from Alsace (where thefamily probably came from to this country). 

John's record carries eligibility to membership in the DAR. He wasprobably too old to fight, but he gave assistance to the Revolution,referred to as follows 

ANCESTOR'S SERVICES 
My ancestor's services in assisting in the establishment of AmericanIndependence during the war of the Revolution were as follows. 

In a list of claims produced and ordered to be certified, County ofShenandoah, Virginia, Aug 29, 1782. 

John Wolfenberger for hire of a horse received. 
2 L 10 S 00 P 

The above information was taken from Public Service Claims ofShenandoah County, in the Virginia State Library at Richmond, and aphotostatic copy of the record may be obtained by making applicationto the Librarian and paying a nominal fee. 

In making application for DAR membership, reference may be made toNational No. 163783." W,M. Creasy 

"This person is the patriarch of the entire SPARGER - SPARGUR family.He moved to Surry County, NC in about 1776 where he changed his namefrom WOLFENBARGER or WOLFENSBERGER to SPARGER. 

He married Christina FREY daughter of Valentine FREY. See ChristinaFREY for information on her ancestors. 

All of his children were born in or near Surry County, NC. AfterChristina died he moved to Highland County, OH, with his son Henrywhere he joined three other of his sons Joseph, Reuben and Phillip,who had already settled there. 

The history of this John W. SPARGER must be credited to Mr W M Creasyof Wilmington, Delaware and Mr J B SPARGER of Mt Airy, NC. Mr SPARGERhad personally visited many of the court houses and obtained valuablerecords of the family. He also had the assistance of many genealogistsin Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Harrisburg, PA and Richmond, VA andvarious other places in the collection of this data. 

[notes by LMJones] 

2 2009 
Re page 10...John W. Spargur went to Ohio with [son] Henry W. andSusannah Roberts (Spargur) who were my gggrandparents and theirdaughter (my g grandmother) Maletha b, 24 Oct 1817. Henry W. andSusannah were married in , Surry, NC, 25 Oct 1816. Maletha marriedDaniel Roads 26 Feb 1837. I have a table they went to housekeepingwith. One of their sons was my grandfather John Q. Roads. email MKP 

See history of Shenandoah County Virginia pages8,45,95,96,124,131-134,709-713. Also references John, Peter, Benjamin Wolfenbarger pg231, and John(Johannes) Wolfenbarger/Wolfensberger Jn asVestryman-Beckford Parish pg 523 

The writings of W. M. Creasy make no mention of Revolutionary Warservice for John W. Sparger (1754-1840). 

Father: Johan or John WOLFERSBERGER OR WOLFENBARGER b: Abt 1730 in ,Alsace, Lorraine, France 
Mother: Hannah SUMMER OR SUMNER b: 1734 in of , Shenandoah, Virginia,USA 

Marriage 1 Christina FREY b: 22 Nov 1759 in , , PA 
•Married: Abt 1777 in , Surry, NC 
•Change Date: 8 Feb 2003 
Children 
1 John W SPARGER b: 1778 in Friedberg, , NC 
2 Reuben W SPARGER b: 17 May 1779 in , Surry, NC 
3 Joseph W SPARGUR b: 1 Mar 1781 in Friedburg, Surry, NC 
4 Hannah W SPARGER b: Abt 1785 in , Surry, NC 
5 Phillipp W SPARGER b: Abt 1786 in , Surry, NC 
6 Henry W SPARGUR b: 1 Dec 1789 in , Surry, NC 
7 William W SPARGER b: 1797 in , Surry, NC 
8 Nancy W SPARGER b: 1801 in , Surry, NC 
9 Sally W SPARGER b: 1803 in , Surry, NC 
John W. (Sparger) Wolfensberger was an 18th Century church vestrymanand Virginia and North Carolina settler. 
John Sparger, who shortened his name from Wolfenberger, was the son ofJohn Wolfenberger and grandson of Johan Wolfersberger, the immigrantwho came to America from Germany. John was born 17 Aug 1754 inHeidelberg, Lebanon, Pennsylvania just outside of what is todaySchaeferstown, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It was a German farmingcommunity centered around the Morovian Church. His father moved thefamily west to Shenandoah County, Virginia around 1769. 
He adopted the spelling Wolfenbarger after he moved to ShenandoahCounty, VA. John with others took oath as Vestrymen in BeckfordParish, Shenandoah, Virginia on March 6, 1771. A Vestryman was not aclergy but rather an official. He may have had the role of supervisinglocal parish public services, such as the workhouse, administration ofpoor relief, or the keeping of parish records (baptisms, deaths andmarriages) and so on. It should be explained that while theWolfersbergers were Lutherans and Reformed Church people, the officeof Vestryman in the Episcopal Church, which was the established Churchin Virginia at that time, was frequently conferred upon members ofother denominations because there were probably not enoughEpiscopalians in the Parish to fill the offices of Vestrymen.According to land records, John Wolfenbarger purchased land inShehandoah County, VA, June 5 1781 - two lots in the town ofWoodstock. 
In 1776 as the Revolution was heating up John Muhlenberg the pastor atthe Anglican church located in the heart of Woodstock gave a famousspeech from the pulpit.  At conclusion of his farewell sermon onJanuary 21, 1776, Muhlenberg threw off his clerical robes to reveal anofficer's uniform beneath and shouted, "there is a time to pray and atime to fight..." With that declaration, the story says he then calledfor volunteers to join the 8th Virginia Regiment under his command.John was probably too old to fight in the American Revolution, but hegave assistance to the Patriots. John W. Sparger and his father JohnJohannes Wolfersberger/Wolfenbarger Jr.were both patriots even thoughthey didn't serve in the Continental Army. Both of them  provided horse/s, stabling, and hay for the Army, according to Virginia PublikClaims records. They are also considered Patriots of the AmericanRevolution by the Daughters of the American Revolution for providingthat assistance. John's younger brother Philip joined the militia andfought in the Battle of Cowpens. 
John got involved with the Frey Family from his home town inPennsylvania. Apparently when they moved to North Carolina he movedwith them. In 1773, a planned community called the FriedbergSettlement, in what is present-day Davidson County outside ofWinston-Salem was attracting settlers from Pennsylvania through theMorovian Church. 
About 1778, John married a woman named Christina Frey in FriedbergSettlement, Surry, North Carolina.  John sold his property inWoodstock on May 14, 1792 and at this time probably moved to NorthCarolina permanently. In fact, when his father's grave was beingthreatened by the construction of a new courthouse in Woodstock, VA hedid not answer the call to collect his father's remains. To this dayhis father's remains are on the property off Main Street somewhere. 
John Sparger moved 250 miles south to an area known as Wachovia, theland the Moravian Church had purchased, was very much on the frontier,and most of the roads of the North Carolina colony were little morethan paths through primeval forests. Some would walk 14 miles tochurch. 
Sometime after his marriage he changed his name to John W. Sparger andnamed his children Reuben W. Sparger, Joseph W. Sparger, etc. Thestory told about this name change is as follows: The sheriff called onJohn to serve a warrant calling John for jury duty. As many others, hehad trouble with names of some of the Moravians that lived in theCounty. The warrant was made out in the name of John W. Sparger.Apparently, John liked this change in name. When his children grew toadults, some of them resettled in Highland Co. Ohio and changed thespelling to Spargur. The reason for this change is not made clear.Those that remained in North Carolina retained the Sparger spelling.Among those who stayed in North Carolina was John W. Sparger (Jr.) whomarried Sarah Lyon about 1816. After John's wife. Christina, died,Rueben Spargur returned to North Carolina and took his father back toOhio with him. John W. Sparger died 17 Nov 1840 in Paint, Highland,Ohio. He was buried in Stringtown, Highland, Ohio. His descendantspurchased a new grave stone at the New Stringtown Cemetery whichreflects the name changes to link the families looking for theirorigins. 

Sources: Daughters of the American Revolution National No. 163783,Public Service Claims of Shenandoah County, in the Virginia StateLibrary at Richmond Aug 29, 1782-"John Wolfenberger for hire of ahorse received" ,history of Shenandoah County Virginia pages8,45,95,96,124, 131-134,709-713. Also references John, Peter, BenjaminWolfenbarger pg 231, and John(Johannes) Wolfenbarger/Wolfensberger Jnas Vestryman-Beckford Parish pg 523, VA Early Census Index 1783Shenandoah Tax List, OH 1840 Pensioners List - Paint, Highland County,Ohio, Wolfensberger Family Association historian 

In 1775 John Wolfenberger moved from Pennsylvania to North Carolina.In North Carolina they changed their name from Wolfenberger toSparger. The children of John Wolfenberger were the first of theSparger generation. 

HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA PAGE 53 
Posted 02 Mar 2016 by NMSantos 

JOHN HENRY SPARGER is one of the few remaining 

veterans of the war between the states. Since the close of 

that great struggle his time and activities have been 

chiefly devoted to the management of a large and 

splendid farm in Surry County, and he is still there in 

advanced years among his children and grandchildren. 

He was born in what is now Mount Airy Township of 

Surry County, October 4, 1841. His great· grandfather was 

a planter and a lifelong resident of Surry County, the 

family having been established here about the time of the 

Revolution. The grandfather, John Sparger, a native of 

Surry County, subsequently removed to Stokes County 

and bought a farm near Chestnut Ridge. On that place he 

had his home and his activities until his death in 1834. He 

married Sally Lyon. Her father, .William Lyon, was a Surry 

County planter. 

Murlin Sparger, father of John H., was born in Surry 

County May 15,1817, and as a youth learned the trade of 

millwright and carpenter. After locating at his home about 

four miles north of Mount Airy he continued following his 

trade and also did farming. Among his contemporaries 

there was hardly a better business man in Surry County. 

His success took the special direction of land holding, and 

he kept adding to his possessions until at one time he was 

owner of upwards of two thousand acres. About half of 

this large estate was across the line in the state of 

Virginia. His home was just half a mile south of the 

Virginia line and in Mount Airy Township. He died on 

November 16, 1877. Murlin Sparger married Bethania 

Cook, who was born near Westfield in Surry County 

January 4, 1817. Her father, John Cook, was born on a 

farm near Westfield and spent his entire life there. Mrs. 

Bethania Sparger died April 27, 1884. Her ten children 

were named Elizabeth, John Henry, William A., Margaret, 

Edith, James H., Frank, Priscilla, Mary E. and George W. 

When not in school as a boy John Henry Sparger was 

working on his father's farm and early familiarized 

himself with the management of land on a large scale. 

At the first call for troops in 1861, when he was twenty 

years of age, he enlisted in Company I of the Twenty-first 

Regiment, North Carolina Troops. His regiment was part 

of Early's division and Ewell's corps. Mr Sparger was 

present and took part in the first great battle of the war, 

Manassas, the results of which are known to every 

American school boy. After that with his regiment he 

participated in many of the more notable conflicts on the 

soil of Virginia, and at the battle of Seven Pines he was 

wounded. He remained with his regiment on duty until he 

was retired in the spring of 1865, and he arrived home 

just fifteen days before the final surrender. 

A courageous soldier, he proved a courageous citizen 

and did not hesitate to undertake the difficult performance 

of the duties which confronted the returned Southern 

soldier. He began farming and in 1868 bought a place in 

Mount Airy township. That was his first home after his 

marriage, and he lived there until 1884, when he returned 

to the old homestead and eventually succeeded to its 

ownership. Many years have been spent in the profitable 

task of general farming and stock raising. His farm 

contains 400 acres, both upland and valley, and while in 

the midst of picturesque surroundings it is also highly 

valuable and productive. His home occupies a position 

commanding an extended view of Johnson Creek Valley 

and surrounding country. The Virginia state lines borders 

the farm on the north. 

In 1870 Mr. Sparger married Ann Matilda Smith, who 

was born in Henry County, Virginia September 17, 1844. 

Her grandfather, Drury Smith, was one of the wealthy oldtime 

planters and owned upwards of 12,000 acres situated 

in four different counties. He not only looked after the 

management of this vast estate with the aid of his slaves 

but also engaged in the manufacture of tobacco and was a 

merchant, having stores in four or five localities. When he 

was eighty-two years of age, still active in business, he 

made a journey to Danbury to transact some affairs. He 

rode horseback, and on the way had to ford the Dan River. 

On returning he found the stream very much swollen, but 

pushed his horse in and while in the current was swept 

from the horse and drowned. Drury Smith was twice 

married. His first wife, the grandmother of Mrs. Sparger, 

was Frances Pitcher. After he death he married to the 

Widow Walker. Of the first union there were six children. 

Mrs. Sparger's father was George W. Smith, who was born 

in Rockingham County, North Carolina, and subsequently 

bought 1,100 acres of land in Mount Airy Township. There 

he was a general farmer and tobacco manufacturer and 

had a large household of slaves. After the death of his 

wife he made his home with Mrs. Sparger and died in his 

ninety-second year. George W. Smith married Mary V. 

Smith, oldest daughter of Ned Smith and granddaughter 

of Drury Smith. She died at the age of sixty-seven, 

having reared children named Green, Tyler, Matilda, Eliza, 

Drury F. and Belle. The son Green died while a soldier in 

the Confederate Arm. 

Six children constitute the Sparger family circle. Their 

names are John G., George M., Walter Munsey, Lilla, 

Emma V. and William Franklin. Emma, who married 

William Samuel Allred, died leaving seven children, named 

Albert, Samuel, John, Mary, Inez, Joseph and Edward. 

George M. married Dixie Ella Jackson, and their four 

children are Jack J., Mary Matilda, Edward and Glenn. Lilla 

is the wife of Tom Brown and their children are named 

Annie, Isabel, Herbert, Murlin, Frank, Robert, Emma, 

Elbert and Jack. Walter Munsey married Annie Ashby and 

has three children John W, Virginia and Janie. 

Mrs. Sparger died May 25, 1917. She was an active 

member of the Salem Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 

Mr. Sparger is an active member of the same church and 

also keeps up with old time army comrades as a member 

of Mount Airy Camp of the United Confederate Veterans





John III, son of John, Jr. married Christina FREY in abt 1777. JohnIII had moved to Surry Co NC in 1776 so Christina was perhaps a nativeof NC. She died in about 1833 then he moved to Highland Co, OH in 1833and died 17 Nov 1840. John III changed his surname to W. SPARGER in NCthen changed it to SPARGUR in Ohio. It is believed that all theirchildren were born under the name of SPARGER. His children that movedto Ohio also changed their names to SPARGUR. Christina was thedaughter of Valentine FREY and Anna Maria Barbara BINCKELE, was bornnear Berne, Switzerland. She was born 4 March 1704. Valentine was theson of Peter FREY. Valentine FREY was born 9 May 1721 at Wingen,Alsace. Christina's maternial Grandfather had 23 children by twowives. Christina is buried in an old country grave yard, near Mt Airy,within sight of the old home adjoining the property of the SPARGEROrchard Company. There is a group of six graves, said to be those ofChristina and some of her family. These graves are not marked so theycan be identified, but they have rough stones at the head and foot ofeach grave. 

1754 Nov 22 born Heidelberg, York, PA; d/o Valentine FREY and AnnaMaria Barbara BINCKELE [RootsWeb says 22 Nov 1759) 
1776 she and husband moved 
1777 marriage in Surry NC to John (Sparger) WOLFENBARGER 
1778 son John W SPARGER born Friedberg, Surry, NC 
1779 May 17 - son Reuben W SPARGER born Surry, NC 
1781 Mar 1- son Joseph W SPARGUR born Friedburg, Surry, NC 
1785 daughter Hannah W SPARGER born Surry, NC 
1786 son Phillipp W SPARGER born Surry, NC 
1789 Dec 1 - son Henry W SPARGUR born Surry, NC 
1790 Federal Census; age ?? 
1797 son William W SPARGER born Surry, NC 
1800 Federal Census; age ?? 
1801 daughter Nancy W SPARGER born Surry, NC 
1803  Sally W SPARGER born Surry, NC 
1810 Federal Census; age ?? 
1820 Federal Census; age ?? 
1830 Federal Census; age ?? 
1832 died in Surry, NC; age 73; buried in an old country grave yard,near Mt Airy, within sight of the old home adjoining the property ofthe SPARGER Orchard Company. There is a group of six graves, said tobe those of Christina and some of her family. These graves are notmarked so they can be identified, but they have rough stones at thehead and foot of each grave. 
1833 husband moved to Highland Co, OH; he died there 17 Nov 1840