Revised 8/1/2017. Copyright @2017; The following Documentary Timeline has been compiled and created by Paul Rhetts. It may be copied for research purposes; but it may not be reproduced for inclusion in any printed or electronic distribution of any kind without the express written permission of the author. Any requests to use this information should be sent to Paul Rhetts, LPDPress@q.com.


Joseph COOPER (1666-1731) m. Lydia RIGGS (1664-1732)
s/o William COOPER (1631-1709) and Margaret PHELPS (1635-1695)
d/o George RIGGS (1630-1687) and Ann THOMAS (1630-1690)
p/o Isaac COOPER (1697-1767)


1664 Lydia RIGGS born at Monmouth, New Jersey (one source says birth in Ireland:
Sketches of the First Emigrant Settlers Newton Township, Old Gloucester County, West New Jersey. by John Clement. reprint publ. by Camden Co. Hist. Soc., 1974, Camden. Originally printed by Chew, Camden NJ 1877, p. 92; Society of Friends, Haddonfield Monthly Meeting, NJ, filmed at Dept of Friends Records, 302 Arch St, Phila. FHL microfilm 20,463. Original records. Record of Births & Deaths 1690-1820, p. 8.]

22 Jul 1666 Joseph COOPER born at Coleshill, Amersham, Hertfordshire, England (one source says 22 Sep 1666:
Sketches of the First Emigrant Settlers Newton Township, Old Gloucester County, West New Jersey. by John Clement. reprint publ. by Camden Co. Hist. Soc., 1974, Camden. Originally printed by Chew, Camden NJ 1877., p. 85, Upperside Monthly Meeting, England]

1680 Father William, mother Margaret, and Joseph Cooper immigrated to Burlington, but soon settled at Pine Point, opposite the site of Philadelphia. [William Cooper was born in Great Britain, early in the year 1632. He married about the year 1660, and not long after was convinced of the Truth, as was also Margaret his wife. Their residence was in the village of Coleshill, in Hertfordshire, where he followed his trade as a blacksmith. Being faithful to the openings of Divine grace, he grew in religious experience, and after a time received a gift in the ministry of the Gospel. In the year 1678 he thought it would be right to remove with his family to America, and settle in the province of New Jersey. Ho laid this prospect before his friends, at a Monthly Meeting at Coleshill, and they granted him the following: "Whereas, William Cooper, of Coleshill, in the parish of Amersham, and the county of Hertford, hath signified unto us that he hath an intention, if the Lord permits, to transport himself, with his wife and children, unto the plantation of West New Jersey; and hath desired a testimonial from this meeting, for the satisfaction of Friends there or elsewhere, unto whom he may be outwardly unknown. We therefore, whose names are here underwritten, do hereby certify all whom it may concern, that the said William Cooper and Margaret his wife, having lived in these parts for many years, ever since the first of their convincement, have walked conscientiously and honestly amongst us, agreeably to the profession and testimony of Truth, according to the best of our observation and knowledge of them. " In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands, this fifth day of the Twelfth month, 1678."] [He was atone time in the Assembly of New Jersey, and he filled some other public stations. A meeting was sometimes held at his house at Pine Point, and although as far as we can learn he did not travel much abroad, in the service of Truth, he yet appears to have been a diligent labourer in his Master's cause at home. That worthy labourer in the Gospel, Joan Vokens, during her travels in America, became acquainted with William and Margaret Cooper, and sometime after her return to England, she addressed them this epistle: "To William Cooper and his wife, dwelling in West Jersey, near Delaware river, not far from Burlington, these are: " Dear and tender friends, William Cooper and M., my love in the unchangeable Truth salutes you, and in the same I still desire your welfare as my own, with all that hold fast their integrity, and retain their first love; they are all near and dear unto me as ever, and my entire love truly reaches to them all. So I desire thou mayest let them know, if they have received my letters and epistles, for I have sent several, but my kinsman dying by the way, makes me question whether what I sent did ever come to any of your hands I sent to you and to S. Spicer, and to Lydia Wright, (as was,) and to her husband, and to her sister, Mary Andrews, and to several on Pennsylvania side, as well as on that side. I should be very glad to hear of your welfare in the Lord Jesus, for this my soul still travails as truly as when I was amongst you. Oh that your faithfulness and living obedience may engage our heavenly Father to answer the breathing desire of my soul for you in those remote places. " I cannot forget you, but the cry often runs through me for your preservation and prosperity every way, and that the honour of Truth, and the good one of another, may be preferred far more than all other things, that our nearness and dearness unto our tender God, and one unto another, may be felt and witnessed, that we may praise his worthy name, and magnify his preserving and delivering power, for it hath been largely manifested, may a little remnant truly say. All have great cause to speak well of his name, and to remember his mercy of old, and to hold the continuation of his favour in great esteem. Blessed be the Lord Jesus, he hath not been wanting to us, but his daily renewed mercies are sufficient, deeply to engage us to faithfulness and obedience, that our heavenly Father may be pleased to continue and multiply his tender dealings towards as. So whatever is yet to come, may never be able to separate us from the sense of his love, or from the seasonedness of his holy fear, or from that cementing life that joins us as members unto Christ our Head; that if trials should abound, we may all feel the love and life of Jesus to superabound. That every bitter cup that is yet to come may besweetened, and all hard things made easy, and we encouraged to travel on in our heavenly progress, keeping a narrow watch in the precious light, and diligently waiting in the same, that we may be filled with heavenly treasure, for all other is very uncertain. We meet here with a sufficient share of many and variable exercises, neither do I expect, that you there, go free, but this I desire above all things, even your living growth in the precious Truth, and that you may endure to the end. Such are assuredly happy, and a blessed reward is prepared for them. In a living sense of the same, may the Lord our God keep us here and you there, that our breathings may be continued one for another, that we may be refreshed one in another, and praise the God of heaven and earth together, in his eternal Spirit, as with one heart and soul. He is worthy to be had in living remembrance, and his pure power to be magnified and renowned over all, and unto it I commit you all, for it is over all, and worthy to have the disposing of us all. With it I leave all, for there is nothing too hard for it to do, and it is worthy to be exalted over all, and that for evermore, saith the soul of your loving sister in the unchangeable Truth. Joan Vokens. London, 28th of Fourth month, 1690. We find W. Cooper amongst those who testified against G. Keith, and signing, both the paper that was put forth by the meetings of ministering Friends, and that by the Yearly Meeting of Discipline. After this we can find little trace of him, except as a representative at Yearly Meeting, until we meet with the brief memorial of his Monthly Meeting. That memorial, after stating that he had been "raised to his gift of exhortation " in Hertfordshire, old England, and had removed to West New Jersey, adds, " and lived here in a godly conversation, exercising his gift in the meeting at Newton, whereunto he belonged, to the benefit of God's people, until it pleased God to remove him. Ho died the 11th of First month, 1710, and was buried in Newton, in the county of Gloucester, in New Jersey aforesaid, being of a good old age, viz., in the latter end of his 78th year. As he lived, so he died, in unity with Friends, and in full assurance of his eternal well-being."
Religious and Literary Journal, Printed by Kite and Walton in Philadelphia, 1855] [-Quaker; Came to America in 1679 or 1680; ship is not known; with wife and children except James; Purchased 50 acres within town of Burlington Oct 5th 1680; Survey of 300 acres at Pyne Point, dated June 12, 1682, at junction of Delaware River & what was later called Cooper's Creek; Survey overlapped with that of William Roydon; dispute eventually settled by a grandson in 1723; Corresponded frequently with William Penn. Was present at Penn's famous treaty with the Indians; A preacher among the Friends: Was a member of the first Legislature & in 1685, & a land commissioner, & a judge in 1696: Sketches of the First Emigrant Settlers Newton Township, Old Gloucester County, West New Jersey. by John Clement. reprint publ. by Camden Co. Hist. Soc., 1974, Camden. Originally printed by Chew, Camden NJ 1877, p. 85-99}


11 Aug 1688 Joseph COOPER and Lydia RIGGS married at Camden, NJ [
Sketches of the First Emigrant Settlers Newton Township, Old Gloucester County, West New Jersey. by John Clement. reprint publ. by Camden Co. Hist. Soc., 1974, Camden. Originally printed by Chew, Camden NJ 1877, p. 92]

1689 dau Elizabeth COOPER born; died 1716; married Samuel MICKLE 20 Apr 1708 (Gloucester County
New Jersey Marriage Records. compiled by H. Stanley Craig. publ. by Craig 1930, Merchantville NJ., Haddonfield Friends Meeting Records, p. 236) [Sketches of the First Emigrant Settlers Newton Township, Old Gloucester County, West New Jersey. by John Clement. reprint publ. by Camden Co. Hist. Soc., 1974, Camden. Originally printed by Chew, Camden NJ 1877., p. 92 & 141]

1691 son Benjamin COOPER born at Gloucester City, Camden, New Jersey; died 9 Oct 1772 at Waterford, Camden, New Jersey; married Rachel MICKLE Jan 1718 at Christ Church, Philadelphia, PA

1693 son Joseph COOPER born; died 1747; married Hannah DENT 1 Mar 1735 at Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA

1697 son Isaac COOPER born at Somerset, Maryland; died 1767 at Gloucester, New Jersey; married Tabitha MILBY on 22 Feb 1731 at Somerset, MD

1698 dau Hannah COOPER born at Monmouth, New Jersey; died 1784 at Waterford, Camden, New Jersey; married Alexander MORGAN on 14 Oct 1717 at Haddonfield, Gloucester, New Jersey

abt 1702 dau Sarah COOPER born at Burlington, NJ; died 10 Nov 1754 at Burlington, Burlington, NJ; married Joshua RAPER on 27 Sep 1720 at Burlington, Burlington, NJ

7 Mar 1710 Father Rev William COOPER died at Gloucester, NJ [Will written & proved: "1709-10 March 7. Cooper, William, of Newton Township, Gloucester Co., yeoman; will of. Sons - Joseph and Daniel Cooper; grandsons - John Cooper and Jonathan Woolstone; daughter, Hannah Scirket; Ipsebath, daughter of Thomas Thackera dec'd. Owns land for his third dividend on 1/8 of 1-20 share of the Province, personal property. Executors - son Daniel and grandson John Cooper. ... Proved March 28, 1710." Inventory 27 March 1710, £710.10.6:
Documents relating to the colonial, revolutionary and post-revolutionary history of the state of New Jersey. aka New Jersey Archives., 23:108.]

10 Jun 1713 Joseph COOPER attended Quaker meeting at home of Thomas SHAKLES at Gloucester, NJ

8 Jan 1731 Joseph COOPER died at Gloucester, New Jersey (one source says Sep 1731: Society of Friends, Haddonfield Monthly Meeting, NJ, filmed at Dept of Friends Records, 302 Arch St, Phila. FHL microfilm 20,463. Original records. Record of Births & Deaths 1690-1820, p. 8.]

28 Nov 1732 Lydia RIGGS died at Gloucester, New Jersey (one source says 18 Oct 1736: Society of Friends, Haddonfield Monthly Meeting, NJ, filmed at Dept of Friends Records, 302 Arch St, Phila. FHL microfilm 20,463. Original records. Record of Births & Deaths 1690-1820, p. 8.]